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Video of Sergio Ballesteros’ brutal Art Walk arrest

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Via Patti Beers: Adam and Sergio were arrested at art walk tonight. About 50 people showed up including the Venice All Stars drumming group.

We marched down Spring Street. I was doing live stream. The music was really good and the people came out of the bars and places The sidewalks were filled with thousands of people watching us and filming us with their phones.

People were excited to see us. The energy level was amazing. Three bicycle cops followed us the entire time.

Roberto saw Adam step into the street and he was immediately arrested.

Sergio was arrested next. He was slammed on to the ground along with his girlfriend who is very tiny. After the cops left about a thousand people
took the street and marched.

I was filming with both cameras at that time.

We then marched to LA CAN.

We lost the Venice All Stars at that point.

Will, the guy who painted the Gandhi painting was there. He climbed up
on something. Four cops came. I thought they were going to arrest him. I ran up to them and spoke to them. Remember I was live streaming. I told them they were escalating the situation. By my magical power, they left.

We marched to the police station where Adam and Sergio were being processed. They are being held at 150 Los Angeles Street by the corner of Temple. Adam’s drum and back pack were released to me. The cops have my address. This makes me nervous.

Later we met up with some other occupiers who had his drum sticks, tambourine and maracas. My live feed dropped out at some point.
I am hoping I captured it all.

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/
 pmbeers

Will upload some video I got on my flip
cam later tonight or tomorrow.
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The girls dressed as Guantanamo inmates in Solidarity Park, just prior to their arrest.

Source: youtube.com
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Art at Solidarity Park Part 1, by Patti Beers. Find Part 2 here, Part 3 here, and Part 4 here. Two more parts will be uploaded later today.

Source: youtube.com
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Since the raid, arrests have been frequent, and the majority have been from protesting peacefully on public property which only days earlier had been accessible to all.

Last night, On December 17th, two protesters were plucked out from an OLA crowd hanging art and protest signs on the fence skirting City Hall, and arrested. One - Omar - was given a ticket and released after two hours. One was brutally beaten by the arresting officers, jailed, and this afternoon The Legal Committee found out that he has been charged with a felony and his bail set at $25,000. The man who was beaten and jailed - Stephen Marcus Releford - is an African American in his twenties renowned for his calm, peaceful and controlled temperament. His arrest, documented by citizen journalists, was arbitrary, vicious and pointless. Omar, a man in his early twenties of Libyan descent, overheard officers concocting a story to justify Stephen’s arrest on the grounds he was violent. Video evidence unequivocably refutes this absolutely. This indicates the kinds of corruption LAPD has instilled in their ranks. It is hard not to see Stephen’s arrest as racially motivated, given that he was one of the few African American males visible in the predominantly white and Hispanic crowd, and yet was one of the most peaceful participants participating in the art-hanging protest.

Stephen was part of a crowd defending their right to free speech and holding a vigil for Bradley Manning, and a vigil for sex workers who have suffered from violence. Officers trying to prevent protesters from hanging their art and participating in the vigil refused to give their name and badge numbers - which is against penal code 830.10. Officers tried to obstruct citizen journalists from filming and questioned protesters’ right to observe, violating their First Amendment Rights under the Constitution. Protesters were told they were obstructing a public walkway under 647c - they were not: traffic on this sidewalk is minimal, and the only obstruction occurred by a police line. Penal code 647c does not give police or other authorities the power to regulate conduct in a public place or sidewalk, which is the basis upon which the LAPD have been citing this code - wrongly, in an effort to justify continual harassment of protesters and abuse.

Other arrests made that evening included six protesters - 5 female and one male - for trespassing into Solidarity Park, wearing orange Guantanamo jumpsuits in protest against the NDAA, and in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. These protesters expected to get arrested, and expressed their desire not to be bailed out before they did this action. Their bail has been set at $5k.

What we are seeing in Los Angeles and all across America, particularly with the passage of the NDAA, is a dizzy descent into the same kind of violent situation as Egypt.

Source: occupylosangeles.org
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More footage of Steven’s arrest from D17.

Source: youtube.com
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Last night, police knocked a citizen journalist’s camera out of her hands in order to prevent her from reporting on the needless arrests and brutality witnessed outside City Hall, as protesters were arrested for hanging art on a fence.

Source: youtube.com
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Freedom’s ustream of D17 arrests and police brutality. Arrests start at about 7.30 in the first, longer, unedited video. The video below is the highlighted, edited version.

Source: ustream.tv
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(Not) Talking to Cops


Anything you say to the police can be used against you and your friends. Whenever the cops ask you anything besides your name and address, it’s safest to say: “I am going to remain silent. I want to see a lawyer.” The cops are then legally required to stop questioning you. They probably won’t, so just keep repeating it. Say it loud enough for witnesses to hear.

Don’t wait for the cops to read you your rights. They usually won’t. Law enforcement agents are legally allowed to lie, and they’re trained to be manipulative. The only thing you should say to them is, “I am going to remain silent. I want to see a lawyer.” (Don’t sign anything, either, without showing it to a lawyer first.)

Searches


Any time the police try to search you, say: “I do not consent to this search.” This may not stop them, but it could get evidence thrown out in court later. This is important, because you might have something on you that is technically illegal (like a pocketknife that’s too long), or the police might plant evidence on you. However, don’t physically resist when cops try to search you, because you could get hurt and charged with assault.

Any time the cops try to search anything connected to you, say: “I do not consent to this search.” Keep saying it, loudly enough for witnesses to hear. This is true for your body, your car, your house, your garage – anything. It’s also true if the cops have a search warrant. There might be a technical problem with the warrant that only comes up later.

Physical Safety


Keep your hands in view and make no sudden movements. Avoid passing behind police officers - nervous cops are dangerous cops. Also, never touch the police or their equipment (vehicles, flashlights, animals, etc.) — you can get beat up and charged with assaulting an officer.

Take Notes!


Whenever you talk to or observe the police, write down their names, ID #s and physical descriptions. Get as many specific details about the incident as you can. Get names and contact info of any witnesses. Cameras and cell phone are great for observing cops, too.

Source: midnightspecial.net
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Invictus captured Officer Navarro - the officer from the video below who pushed her - refusing to give out his name and badge number to protesters who wished to report the brutality and misconduct of the police last night. Officer Navarro refused all requests, and seemed to find the situation amusing.

Source: ustream.tv